Poland’s Crime Against History / Polens Verbrechen gegen die Geschichte

JERUSALEM – My parents and I arrived in Tel Aviv a few months before World War II began. The rest of our extended family – three of my grandparents, my mother’s seven siblings, and my five cousins – remained in Poland. They were all murdered in the Holocaust.

I have visited Poland many times, always accompanied by the presence of the Jewish absence. Books and articles of mine have been translated into Polish. I have lectured at the University of Warsaw and Krakow’s Jagiellonian University. I was recently elected an external member of the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences. Though my knowledge of the Polish language is scant, the country’s history and culture are not foreign to me.

For these reasons, I recognize why Poland’s government recently introduced legislation on historical matters. But I am also furious.

The Poles understandably view themselves primarily as victims of the Nazis. No country in occupied Europe suffered similarly. It was the only country that, under German occupation, had its government institutions liquidated, its army disbanded, its schools and universities closed. Even its name was wiped off the map. In a replay of the eighteenth-century partitions of Poland by Russia and Prussia, the 1939 Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact led to the Soviet occupation of eastern Poland in the wake of the German invasion. No trace of Polish authority remained.

The total destruction of the Polish state and its institutions made Poland an ideal location for the German extermination camps, in which six million Polish citizens – three million Jews and three million ethnic Poles – were murdered. Everywhere else in German-controlled Europe, the Nazis had to deal, sometimes in an extremely complicated way, with local governments, if only for tactical reasons.

This is why Poland is right to insist that the camps not be called “Polish extermination camps” (as even US President Barack Obama once mistakenly referred to them). They were German camps in occupied Poland.

But the current Polish government is making a serious mistake by trying to criminalize any reference to “Polish extermination camps.” Only non-democratic regimes use such means, rather than relying on public discourse, historical clarification, diplomatic contacts, and education.

The government’s proposed legislation goes even further: it makes any reference to ethnic Poles’ role in the Holocaust a criminal offense. It also refers to what it calls “historical truth” regarding the wartime massacre of Jews in the town of Jedwabne by their Polish neighbors.

When the historian Jan Gross published his study establishing that Poles, not Germans, burned alive hundreds of Jedwabne’s Jews, Poland naturally suffered a major crisis of conscience. Two Polish presidents, Aleksander Kwaśniewski and Bronisław Komorowski, accepted the findings and publicly asked for the victims’ forgiveness. As Komorowski put it, “even in a nation of victims, there appear to be murderers.” Now, however, the authorities claim that the issue must be re-examined, even calling for the mass graves to be exhumed.

The government’s views and ideology are an internal Polish matter. But if it seeks to gloss over or deny problematic aspects of Polish history, even those who identify with Poland’s pain may raise questions that, in recognition of Poles’ terrible suffering, have until now been largely overlooked. These questions are neither trivial nor directed at the behavior of individuals. They implicate national decisions.

The first question concerns the timing of the Warsaw Uprising in August 1944. The Poles justly point out that the Red Army, which had reached the Vistula, did not help the Polish fighters and actually let the Germans suppress the insurgency unimpeded – one of Stalin’s most cynical moves.

But why did the Polish underground (Armia Krajowa, or Home Army), controlled by the Polish government-in-exile in London, strike at this moment, when the Germans were already retreating, eastern Poland was already liberated, and the Red Army was about to liberate Warsaw itself? The official Polish explanation is that the uprising against the Germans was also a pre-emptive strike against the Soviet Union, intended to ensure that Polish, not Soviet, forces liberated Warsaw.

That may explain (though obviously not justify) the Soviets’ refusal to help the Poles. Yet questions linger: Why did the Home Army wait more than four years to rise against German occupation? Why did it not disrupt the systematic extermination of three million Jews, all Polish citizens, or strike during the Jewish uprising in the Warsaw Ghetto in April 1943?

One sometimes hears arguments about how many guns the Home Army sent – or did not send – to the fighters in the ghetto. But that is not the question. The German suppression of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising took weeks; on the “Aryan side,” Poles saw and heard what was happening – and did nothing.

We cannot know the outcome had the Home Army joined the Jews – not only in Warsaw but throughout occupied Poland, where it had prepared thousands of its members for a possible uprising. What is certain is that the Nazi SS would have found it more difficult to liquidate the ghetto; moreover, joining what was considered a “Jewish uprising” would have been powerful proof of solidarity with Polish Jews. The key point is that highlighting the moral dimension of the decision to start an uprising to prevent the Soviets from liberating Warsaw, while ignoring the failure to act to prevent the murder of three million Polish Jews and join the ghetto uprising, can be legitimately questioned.

This raises another long-suppressed question. By March 1939, the British and French governments knew that appeasing Hitler had failed: after destroying Czechoslovakia, Nazi Germany was turning against Poland. That spring, Britain and France issued a guarantee to defend Poland against a German invasion.

At the same time, the Soviet Union proposed to the British and the French a united front against German aggression toward Poland – the first attempt to develop a Soviet-Western anti-Nazi alliance. In August 1939, an Anglo-French military delegation traveled to Moscow, where the head of the Soviet delegation, Defense Minister Kliment Voroshilov, asked the Western officers a simple question: would the Polish government agree to the entry of Soviet troops, which would be necessary to repel a German invasion?

After weeks of dithering, the Polish government refused. As a Polish government minister reportedly asked: “If the Soviet Army enters Poland, who knows when they would leave?” The Anglo-French-Soviet talks collapsed, and a few days later the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact was signed.

One can understand the Polish position: on regaining independence in 1918, Poland found itself in a brutal war with the Red Army, which was poised to occupy Warsaw. Only French military support helped repel the Russians and save Poland’s independence. In 1939, it appeared that Poland feared the Soviet Union more than it feared Nazi Germany

No one can know whether Poland would have avoided German occupation had it agreed to the Red Army’s entry in the event of an invasion, much less whether WWII or the Holocaust might have been prevented. But it is reasonable to maintain that the government made one of the most fateful and catastrophic choices in Poland’s history. In one way or another, its stance made the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact possible, and the 1944 Warsaw Uprising brought about the city’s near-total destruction.

In no way should this be viewed as an attempt to blame the victim. The moral and historical guilt belongs to Nazi Germany and, in parallel, to the Soviet Union. But if the current Polish government wishes to revise history, these broader issues must also be addressed. A nation and its leaders are responsible for the consequences of their decisions.

Recently, I visited POLIN, the Jewish museum in Warsaw, initiated by then-President Kwaśniewski. I was deeply impressed not only by the richness and presentation of the materials, but also by the sophistication and historical integrity underlying the entire project: without the Jews, the exhibition made clear, Poland would not be Poland.

Yet the museum also shows the darker side of this intertwined history, especially the emergence in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries of Roman Dmowski’s radical nationalist and anti-Semitic Endecja party. A non-Jewish friend who accompanied me said: “Now is the time to build a Polish museum with a comparable standard.”

Shlomo Avineri will be attending this year’s Forum 2000 conference, The Courage to Take Responsibility, which will be held in Prague, Czech Republic, October 16-19.

https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/poland-crime-against-history-by-shlomo-avineri-2016-09

JERUSALEM – Ein paar Monate vor Beginn des Zweiten Weltkriegs kamen meine Eltern und ich in Tel Aviv an. Der Rest der Familie und Verwandte – drei meiner Großeltern, die sieben Geschwister meiner Mutter und fünf meiner Cousins – blieben in Polen. Sie alle wurden im Holocaust ermordet.

Ich habe Polen viele Male besucht, immer begleitet von allgegenwärtiger jüdischer Abwesenheit. Von mir verfasste Bücher und Artikel wurden ins Polnische übersetzt. Ich unterrichtete an der Universität von Warschau und an der Jagiellonen-Universität in Krakau. Kürzlich wurde ich zu einem externen Mitglied der Polnischen Akademie der Wissenschaften und Künste gewählt. Trotz meiner spärlichen Kenntnisse der polnischen Sprache sind mir Geschichte und Kultur des Landes nicht fremd.

Aus diesen Gründen verstehe ich, warum die polnische Regierung jüngst Gesetze für historische Angelegenheiten verabschiedete. Aber ich bin auch wütend.

Die Polen betrachten sich verständlicherweise in erster Linie als Opfer der Nazis. Kein Land im besetzten Europa litt in ähnlicher Weise. Polen war das einzige Land, in dem unter deutscher Besatzung Regierungsinstitutionen sowie Armee aufgelöst und Schulen und Universitäten geschlossen wurden. Sogar der Landesname wurde von der Landkarte gelöscht. Wie eine Neuauflage der Teilungen Polens durch Russland und Preußen im 18. Jahrhundert führte der deutsch-sowjetische Nichtangriffspakt aus dem Jahr 1939 im Gefolge der deutschen Invasion zur sowjetischen Besetzung Ostpolens. Von polnischer Staatsmacht blieb keine Spur.

Die totale Zerstörung des polnischen Staates und seiner Institutionen ließen das Land zu einem idealen Ort für die deutschen Vernichtungslager werden, in denen sechs Millionen polnische Bürger – drei Millionen Juden und drei Millionen ethnische Polen – ermordet wurden. Überall sonst in dem von Deutschland kontrollierten Europa mussten sich die Nazis, wenn auch nur aus taktischen Gründen, in manchmal überaus komplizierter Art und Weise mit lokalen Regierungen auseinandersetzen.

Aus diesem Grund beharrt Polen zurecht darauf, dass diese Lager nicht als „polnische Vernichtungslager“ bezeichnet werden sollen (wie es sogar US-Präsident Barack Obama einst fälschlicherweise tat). Es handelte sich um deutsche Lager im besetzten Polen.

Mit ihrem Versuch, jeden Verweis auf „polnische Vernichtungslager“ zu kriminalisieren, begeht die derzeitige polnische Regierung jedoch einen schweren Fehler. Lediglich undemokratische Regime bedienen sich derartiger Methoden anstatt sich auf den öffentlichen Diskurs, historische Klarstellung, diplomatische Kontakte und Bildung zu verlassen.

Der Gesetzesentwurf der Regierung geht sogar noch weiter: darin wird nämlich jeder Verweis auf die Rolle ethnischer Polen im Holocaust zu einer Straftat gemacht. Hinsichtlich des während des Krieges in der Stadt Jedwabne an Juden von deren Nachbarn verübten Massakers bezieht sich die Regierung außerdem auf die von ihr so bezeichnete „historische Wahrheit“.

Als der Historiker Jan Gross seine Studie veröffentlichte, in der er darlegte, dass nicht Deutsche, sondern Polen hunderte Juden aus Jedwabne bei lebendigem Leib verbrannten, löste dies in Polen natürlich eine veritable Gewissenkrise aus. Zwei polnische Präsidenten – Aleksander Kwaśniewski und Bronisław Komorowski – akzeptierten die Erkenntnisse aus dieser Arbeit und baten die Opfer öffentlich um Vergebung. Komorowski formulierte, dass es „sogar in einer Nation der Opfer offenbar Mörder gibt.” Mittlerweile allerdings behaupten die Behörden, die Angelegenheit müsse erneut untersucht werden und sie fordern sogar die Exhumierung der Leichen aus den Massengräbern.

Ansichten und Ideologie der Regierung sind eine innere Angelegenheit Polens. Wenn man allerdings versucht, problematische Aspekte der polnischen Geschichte unter den Teppich zu kehren oder zu leugnen, werden auch diejenigen, die sich mit dem Schmerz Polens identifizieren, möglicherweise Fragen aufwerfen, die in Anerkennung der schrecklichen Leiden der Polen bislang weitgehend übersehen wurden. Diese Fragen sind weder trivial noch an das Verhalten von Einzelpersonen geknüpft. Es geht dabei vielmehr um nationale Entscheidungen.

Die erste Frage betrifft den zeitlichen Ablauf des Warschauer Aufstandes im August 1944. Die Polen verweisen mit Recht darauf, dass die Rote Armee, die bereits an der Weichsel stand, den polnischen Kämpfern nicht zu Hilfe kam und die Deutschen den Aufstand praktisch ungehindert niederschlagen ließ – einer der zynischsten Schritte Stalins.

Aber warum schlug der von der polnischen Exilregierung in London kontrollierte polnische Untergrund (die Armia Krajowa oder Heimatarmee) ausgerechnet in dem Moment zu, als sich die Deutschen bereits auf dem Rückzug befanden, Ostpolen bereits befreit war und die Rote Armee kurz vor der Befreiung Warschaus stand? Die offizielle polnische Erklärung lautet, dass der Aufstand gegen die Deutschen auch ein Präventivschlag gegen die Sowjetunion war, womit gewährleistet werden sollte, dass nicht sowjetische, sondern polnische Truppen Warschau befreiten.

Das mag vielleicht erklären (wenn auch offensichtlich nicht rechtfertigen), warum sich die Sowjets weigerten, den Polen zu Hilfe zu kommen. Dennoch bleiben Fragen: Warum wartete die Heimatarmee über vier Jahre, um sich gegen die deutsche Besatzung zu erheben? Warum wurde nichts gegen die systematische Vernichtung von drei Millionen Juden unternommen, bei denen es sich allesamt um polnische Staatsbürger handelte oder warum schlug man nicht während des jüdischen Aufstandes im Warschauer Ghetto im April 1943 zu?

Manchmal hört man Argumente darüber, wie viele Waffen die Heimatarmee an die Kämpfer im Ghetto schickte – oder nicht schickte. Das ist allerdings nicht die Frage. Die Niederschlagung des Aufstandes im Warschauer Ghetto durch die Deutschen dauerte Wochen; auf der „arischen Seite“ hörten und sahen die Polen was geschah – und sie taten nichts.

Wir können nicht wissen, was geschehen wäre, hätte sich die Heimatarmee den Juden angeschlossen – nicht nur in Warschau, sondern im gesamten besetzten Polen, wo man tausende Armeeangehörige auf einen möglichen Aufstand vorbereitete. Sicher ist allerdings, dass es für die SS schwieriger geworden wäre, das Ghetto zu liquidieren. Außerdem wäre es ein starkes Zeichen der Solidarität mit den polnischen Juden gewesen, hätte man sich den als „jüdisch“ bezeichneten Aufstand angeschlossen. Der entscheidende Punkt ist: die Hervorhebung der moralischen Dimension der Entscheidung, einen Aufstand zu beginnen, um die Sowjets an der Befreiung Warschaus zu hindern und gleichzeitig außer Acht zu lassen, dass man untätig blieb, als es darum ging, den Mord an drei Millionen polnischer Juden zu verhindern, darf berechtigterweise in Frage gestellt werden.

Das wirft eine weitere lange Zeit unterdrückte Frage auf. Im März 1939 wussten die britische und die französische Regierung, dass die Appeasement-Politik gegenüber Hitler gescheitert war: nach der Zerstörung der Tschechoslowakei, wandte sich Nazi-Deutschland gegen Polen. In diesem Frühling gaben Großbritannien und Frankreich eine Garantie ab, Polen gegen eine deutsche Invasion zu verteidigen.

Gleichzeitig schlug die Sowjetunion den Briten und Franzosen eine geeinte Front gegen die deutsche Aggression gegenüber Polen vor – der erste Versuch, eine Allianz der Sowjets und des Westens gegen die Nazis zu bilden. Im August 1939 reiste eine englisch-französische Delegation nach Moskau, wo der Vorsitzende der sowjetischen Delegation, Verteidigungsminister Kliment Woroschilow, den westlichen Vertretern eine simple Frage stellte: würde die polnische Regierung dem für die Zurückschlagung einer deutschen Invasion notwendigen Einsatz sowjetischer Truppen auf ihrem Territorium zustimmen?

Nach wochenlangem Hin und Her, verweigerte die polnische Regierung ihre Zustimmung. Ein polnischer Regierungsminister meinte angeblich: „Wer weiß, wann die Sowjetarmee im Falle eines Einsatzes in Polen wieder abzieht.“ Die Gespräche zwischen Briten, Franzosen und Sowjets scheiterten und ein paar Tage später wurde der deutsch-sowjetische Nichtangriffspakt unterzeichnet.

Man kann die polnische Position verstehen: nach Wiedererlangung der Unabhängigkeit im Jahr 1918 fand sich Polen in einem brutalen Kampf mit der Roten Armee wieder, die darauf aus war, Warschau zu besetzen. Nur mit militärischer Unterstützung Frankreichs gelang es, die Russen zu zurückzuschlagen und Polens Unabhängigkeit zu sichern. Im Jahr 1939 schien es, als ob Polen die Sowjetunion mehr fürchtete als Nazi-Deutschland.

Niemand weiß, ob die deutsche Besetzung Polens zu verhindern gewesen wäre, wenn Polen dem Einsatz der Roten Armee im Falle einer Invasion zugestimmt hätte und noch viel weniger kann gesagt werden, ob der Zweite Weltkrieg oder der Holocaust hätten verhindert werden können.  Dennoch kann man vernünftigerweise behaupten, dass die Regierung eine der verhängnisvollsten und katastrophalsten Entscheidungen in der polnischen Geschichte traf. Auf die eine oder andere Weise ermöglichte ihre Haltung den deutsch-sowjetischen Nichtangriffspakt und der Warschauer Aufstand 1944 führte zur fast vollständigen Zerstörung der Stadt.

Keinesfalls soll dies als Versuch betrachtet werden, dem Opfer die Schuld zuzuweisen. Die moralische und historische Schuld gilt Nazi-Deutschland und parallel dazu der Sowjetunion. Wenn die derzeitige polnische Regierung allerdings die Geschichte einer Überprüfung unterziehen möchte, müssen auch diese allgemeineren Fragen beantwortet werden. Eine Nation und ihre Führung sind verantwortlich für die Folgen ihrer Entscheidungen.

Kürzlich besuchte ich POLIN, das auf Initiative des damaligen Präsidenten Kwaśniewski errichtete jüdische Museum in Warschau. Ich war tief beeindruckt, nicht nur von der Vielfalt und der Präsentation der Ausstellungsstücke, sondern auch von der Differenziertheit und historischen Integrität, die dem gesamten Projekt zugrunde liegen: ohne Juden, so stellt die Ausstellung klar, wäre Polen nicht Polen.

Doch das Museum zeigt auch die dunklere Seite dieser verflochtenen Geschichte, insbesondere die Entstehung der radikal nationalistischen und antisemitischen Endecja-Partei Roman Dmowskis im späten 19. und frühen 20. Jahrhundert. Ein nicht-jüdischer Freund, der mich begleitete, sagte: „Jetzt ist es Zeit, ein polnisches Museum vergleichbaren Standards zu errichten.“

Aus dem Englischen von Helga Klinger-Groier

https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/poland-crime-against-history-by-shlomo-avineri-2016-09/german

 

Kommentar verfassen

Trage deine Daten unten ein oder klicke ein Icon um dich einzuloggen:

WordPress.com-Logo

Du kommentierst mit Deinem WordPress.com-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Twitter-Bild

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Twitter-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Facebook-Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Facebook-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Google+ Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Google+-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Verbinde mit %s